Posts Tagged ‘meetings’

  • Wide Links #16: Meeting, Coaching, Bridging, Chatting

    Wide Links #16: Meeting, Coaching, Bridging, Chatting

    Dec 3, 10 • In Links

    A heaping helping of links for remote workers today! In this edition, why work often doesn’t happen at work; an open thread on managing remote workers; advice for improving communication between the main office and remote workers – and much, much more. Making a long-distance relationship work: When feds go remote – Tom Fox tags: wideteams Don’t forget the small talk.When separated by distance, it’s even more important to make small talk about the little things in life to build rapport. Don’t forget to establish a sort of virtual water cooler for your folks by talking with them about their lives, the big game or whatever you can find to make a personal connection. Consider having your team virtually share their favorite recipes or books each week to help them stay connected while telecommuting. Jason

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  • Screencast: Cardmeeting

    Screencast: Cardmeeting

    Dec 1, 10 • In Toolkit

    One of the simplest, most versatile tools for meetings is the good ole’ stack of index cards. Is it possible to recreate the experience of pushing 3×5 cards around on the table in a virtual meeting? In this video I demonstrate a free tool that does a pretty good job of it. Sometimes the simple tools are the most useful. Cardmeeting is a tool that enables members of a dispersed team to collaboratively move virtual index cards around on a virtual table top. Best of all, it’s completely free! Check out this video for a quick demonstration

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  • Wide Teams Podcast Episode 19: Interview with Steven Willmott

    Wide Teams Podcast Episode 19: Interview with Steven Willmott

    Nov 23, 10 • In Interviews, Podcast

    In this episode of the Wide Teams podcast, I interview Steven Willmott of 3Scale. We talk about supporting clients in multiple timezones, what you do when one of your developers who lives on a mountainside and generates his own power gets hit with a snowstorm, and much more!

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  • Meetings and Distributed Introverts

    Meetings and Distributed Introverts

    Nov 5, 10 • In Experiences, Practices

    For an introvert, any meeting can be trying. In this guest article, contributor Chris Strom talks about how distributed meetings are especially taxing for those of an introverted bent, and some of his strategies for coping. I am a strong introvert. As with most introverts, I lose energy when I interact with people. Meetings, in particular, drain me. Since they are a staple of a professional career, I have built up something of a tolerance for meetings. Remote meetings, however, continue to confound me. Everything about remote meetings saps more energy than the in-person equivalent. By itself, any one thing does not amount to much. But, by the end of a meeting, I am completely drained. I have no fight left. I care more about reaching the end than reaching consensus. In my experience, eye

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  • Retrospectives for Dispersed Teams

    Retrospectives for Dispersed Teams

    Oct 28, 10 • In Practices

    Many agile teams practice regular retrospectives – meetings where they evaluate review recent progress, events, and challenges, gauge the team’s mood, and propose changes to the way they work. For distributed teams, the retrospective is especially important. Here are some tips for holding a retrospective with a remote team. In any team it’s a good idea to take some time regularly to look back, discuss what went well and what went not so well, and make adjustments. In Agile software development this meeting is known as a Retrospective. Esther Derby and Diana Larsen describe a Retrospective like this: A special meeting where the team gathers after completing an increment of work to inspect and adapt their methods and teamwork. For dispersed teams, retrospectives are essential. Because dispersed teams are so dependant on effective practices and

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  • Avoid meeting hiccups with a dress rehearsal

    Avoid meeting hiccups with a dress rehearsal

    Oct 26, 10 • In Practices

    Coordinating a large remote meeting can seem like putting on a major stage production. Make sure your meetings go off without a hitch by practicing first. Picture this: it’s time for the very first whole-company monthly meeting since adding remote team members to the team. The presentation slides are all ready, everyone is at their desk, the clock is ticking – and half the company can’t connect to the videoconferencing server. You start a frantic troubleshooting session. People are tapping their fingers. Your manager starts wondering if building a dispersed team was such a great idea. This scenario is all too common in distributed teams. The fact is, remote workers are dependent on technology in order to make collaboration possible, and that technology doesn’t always perform as expected – often going down at the worst

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  • Get up, stand up: Coordinating with a Daily Meeting

    Get up, stand up: Coordinating with a Daily Meeting

    Sep 9, 10 • In Practices

    A short daily meeting is a great way to keep your team members on the same page. But holding a virtual meeting every day can pose special challenges. This article discusses different ways that real dispersed teams handle daily meetings. Almost all of the dispersed teams I’ve talked to have had some kind of daily meeting during the week in order to say in sync with each other. They usually use the term “daily standup”, as popularized by various Agile methodologies, although in my experienced distributed teams don’t usually physically stand up during these meetings. This has less to do with a lack of team energy and more to do with being able to be seen on their webcams. The typical format for a daily standup is to go around the “room” and answer the

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  • Using a Control Channel to facilitate virtual meetings

    Using a Control Channel to facilitate virtual meetings

    Jun 29, 10 • In Tips & Hacks

    Data communications protocols are often divided into a control channel and a data channel. An example from electrical engineering are the “control lines” and “data lines” in an RS-232 connector. The FTP protocol uses a similar arrangement, where a control connection is opened to port 21, and a data connection to port 20. The source of this common pattern is the realization that it is fundamentally difficult to manage a conversation using the same channel you are using to have the conversation. It’s hard to say “wait, you’re sending me too much information” if the pipe you you need to send that message on is clogged with all that information. Human conversations use a control channel as well. Our data channel, of course, is our voices. But when people are gathered in a room for a

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  • Remote Toolkit: MindMeister (Screencast)

    Remote Toolkit: MindMeister (Screencast)

    Jun 17, 10 • In Toolkit

    A short screencast demoing one of my favorite remote team collaboration tools: MindMeister. In it, I demonstrate how mind maps can be built collaboratively by multiple users, and talk a little about how this can be useful in remote meetings

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